GPS on the Neo 1973

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=== Possible GPS programs ===
  
 
As people develop more sophisticated GPS applications, please note them here.
 
As people develop more sophisticated GPS applications, please note them here.
  
Here are some ideas for possibilites:
+
Here are some ideas for possibilities:
  
 
* Cairo-based mapping
 
* Cairo-based mapping
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* Routing
 
* Routing
  
* Openstreetmap logger, (with voice annotations)
+
* [[Openstreetmap]] logger, (with voice annotations)
  
 
* [http://lists.openmoko.org/pipermail/community/2007-July/007252.html collection of ideas]
 
* [http://lists.openmoko.org/pipermail/community/2007-July/007252.html collection of ideas]
  
 
[[Category:GPS]]
 
[[Category:GPS]]

Revision as of 22:47, 16 August 2007

The Neo1973 device contains an integrated GPS. The particular device is marketed as an AGPS, and there is some discussion available as to what significance that "A" might have.

All purchased phones do not include the GPS binary driver. [1]

In the very early shipment to 50 Phase 1 developers, a binary-only program for talking to the the GPS was accidentally included in /home/root/DM2/gps, (and presumably, the same binary would function on a P0 device).

There is an ongoing effort to write a Free Software program that could be used instead of this binary-only program. See Hammerhead/Protocol for details and the latest status.

For those few with the binary driver in the meantime, Pavel Machek provides the following script for recording an NMEA stream from the binary program:

#!/bin/sh
echo 1 > /sys/class/leds/gta01\:vibrator/brightness
killall gllin cat
sleep 1
echo 0 > /sys/class/leds/gta01\:vibrator/brightness
mknod /tmp/nmeaNP p
cat /tmp/nmeaNP >> /tmp/gps.nmea &
/home/root/DM2/gps/gllin -low 5
/home/root/DM2/gps/gllin -periodic 3

He also succeeded at getting the Neo1973 to act like a bluetooth GPS with the following script: (Note that this script has bad problems if you run it more than once. You can get a "time traveling GPS" effect, with the GPS showing you your past position).

#!/bin/sh
killall rfcomm tail
mknod /dev/rfcomm0 c 216 0
echo 1 > /sys/devices/platform/s3c2410-i2c/i2c-0/0-0008/gta01-pm-bt.0/power_on
sleep 1
hciconfig hci0 up name linuxgps
sleep 1
sdpd
sleep 1
sdptool add SP
(
        while true; do
        rfcomm listen /dev/rfcomm0 1
        sleep 1
        done
) &
(
        while true; do
            tail -f /tmp/gps.nmea > /dev/rfcomm0
            echo 1 > /sys/class/leds/gta01\:vibrator/brightness
            sleep 1
            echo 0 > /sys/class/leds/gta01\:vibrator/brightness
        done
) &


Possible GPS programs

As people develop more sophisticated GPS applications, please note them here.

Here are some ideas for possibilities:

  • Cairo-based mapping
  • Routing
Personal tools

The Neo1973 device contains an integrated GPS. The particular device is marketed as an AGPS, and there is some discussion available as to what significance that "A" might have.

All purchased phones do not include the GPS binary driver. [1]

In the very early shipment to 50 Phase 1 developers, a binary-only program for talking to the the GPS was accidentally included in /home/root/DM2/gps, (and presumably, the same binary would function on a P0 device).

There is an ongoing effort to write a Free Software program that could be used instead of this binary-only program. See Hammerhead/Protocol for details and the latest status.

For those few with the binary driver in the meantime, Pavel Machek provides the following script for recording an NMEA stream from the binary program:

#!/bin/sh
echo 1 > /sys/class/leds/gta01\:vibrator/brightness
killall gllin cat
sleep 1
echo 0 > /sys/class/leds/gta01\:vibrator/brightness
mknod /tmp/nmeaNP p
cat /tmp/nmeaNP >> /tmp/gps.nmea &
/home/root/DM2/gps/gllin -low 5
/home/root/DM2/gps/gllin -periodic 3

He also succeeded at getting the Neo1973 to act like a bluetooth GPS with the following script: (Note that this script has bad problems if you run it more than once. You can get a "time traveling GPS" effect, with the GPS showing you your past position).

#!/bin/sh
killall rfcomm tail
mknod /dev/rfcomm0 c 216 0
echo 1 > /sys/devices/platform/s3c2410-i2c/i2c-0/0-0008/gta01-pm-bt.0/power_on
sleep 1
hciconfig hci0 up name linuxgps
sleep 1
sdpd
sleep 1
sdptool add SP
(
        while true; do
        rfcomm listen /dev/rfcomm0 1
        sleep 1
        done
) &
(
        while true; do
            tail -f /tmp/gps.nmea > /dev/rfcomm0
            echo 1 > /sys/class/leds/gta01\:vibrator/brightness
            sleep 1
            echo 0 > /sys/class/leds/gta01\:vibrator/brightness
        done
) &


As people develop more sophisticated GPS applications, please note them here.

Here are some ideas for possibilites:

  • Cairo-based mapping
  • Routing
  • Openstreetmap logger, (with voice annotations)