Freerunner RFID Board

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Freerunner RFID Board

NOTE: This is work in progress and quite incomplete

Contents

Features

The FRIDB realizes an experimental platform for RFID (13.56 MHz). It consists of an Antenna, a ST Micro M24LR64 RFID-Tag Chip with EEPROM port and a Texas Instruments TRF7960 RFID reader chip with SPI interface.

So you can make the Freerunner either a RFID tag (e.g. to open doors) or a RFID reader (to read/write standard tags e.g. in credit card format).

The board comes with three parts that can/must be separated:

  • Antenna
  • RFID-Tag with I2C EEPROM (ST Micro M24LR64)
  • RFID-Reader with SPI interface (TI TRF7960)

Either the Tag or the Reader module fits into the area above the SIM/SD card reader of the Openmoko Freerunner. It is up to you to wire the board to the Freerunner main board in a way that you can still swap SD cards and/or SIM cards.

The FRIDB can also connected to other Microcontrollers and SoC (e.g BeagleBoard) since it has splitted I/O and power supply.

Expansion pads

The supply voltage as well as the SPI / I2C bus is routed to testpads at the end of the board.

Documentation

The project home is http://projects.goldelico.com/p/fridb/. There, you can find background information, instructions, software etc.

Schematic and board layout files are available in CadSoft EAGLE 5.x format from http://projects.goldelico.com/p/fridb/downloads/.

Pinout

File:FRIDB-Pinout.jpg
Pinout: Bottom side, Top side
I2C testpoints
  • VCC: +3.3V, available at the AUX-Switch
  • VIO: +1.8 V - +3.3V, available at the AUX-Switch
  • GND: Ground, available from the (big) decoupling capacitor next to the accelerometer
  • SCL, SDA: Serial clock and data, get it from testpoints at the debug connector
  • OE: Output enable from the frequency generator. Pull this pin high to enable the CLK output
  • CLK: Clock output from the frequency generator.
  • LED controller 0-3: LED current sinks. Connect LEDs in series with current limiting resistors from VCC to these pads.
  • 12-Bit A/D 0-3: Analog to digital converter inputs. They can operate single ended or differencial. The reference voltage is VCC.
  • Touch electrodes 0-6: Connect these pads to a larger conducting area to use it as touch sensor. The inputs 0-3 can also be used to drive LEDs. Refer to the datasheet for more information.
File:FRIDB-top.JPG
Top side with the M24LR64 and the TRF7960

Installation

Hardware installation

The best way to connect the FRIDB to your Freerunner is to solder four wires to...

Here is a PDF with an overview of the Installation.

Software installation

Issues

Known HW or SW Issues


Software

Kernel drivers

Upcoming.

Bugs

Userspace software

n/a yet. Volunteers welcome!

Availability

The handheld-linux.com team kindly offered to retail the FRIDB. You can find it here.


User Reports

Please write to the discussion page.

Personal tools
Freerunner RFID Board

NOTE: This is work in progress and quite incomplete

Features

The FRIDB realizes an experimental platform for RFID (13.56 MHz). It consists of an Antenna, a ST Micro M24LR64 RFID-Tag Chip with EEPROM port and a Texas Instruments TRF7960 RFID reader chip with SPI interface.

So you can make the Freerunner either a RFID tag (e.g. to open doors) or a RFID reader (to read/write standard tags e.g. in credit card format).

The board comes with three parts that can/must be separated:

  • Antenna
  • RFID-Tag with I2C EEPROM (ST Micro M24LR64)
  • RFID-Reader with SPI interface (TI TRF7960)

Either the Tag or the Reader module fits into the area above the SIM/SD card reader of the Openmoko Freerunner. It is up to you to wire the board to the Freerunner main board in a way that you can still swap SD cards and/or SIM cards.

The FRIDB can also connected to other Microcontrollers and SoC (e.g BeagleBoard) since it has splitted I/O and power supply.

Expansion pads

The supply voltage as well as the SPI / I2C bus is routed to testpads at the end of the board.

Documentation

The project home is http://projects.goldelico.com/p/fridb/. There, you can find background information, instructions, software etc.

Schematic and board layout files are available in CadSoft EAGLE 5.x format from http://projects.goldelico.com/p/fridb/downloads/.

Pinout

File:FRIDB-Pinout.jpg
Pinout: Bottom side, Top side
I2C testpoints
  • VCC: +3.3V, available at the AUX-Switch
  • VIO: +1.8 V - +3.3V, available at the AUX-Switch
  • GND: Ground, available from the (big) decoupling capacitor next to the accelerometer
  • SCL, SDA: Serial clock and data, get it from testpoints at the debug connector
  • OE: Output enable from the frequency generator. Pull this pin high to enable the CLK output
  • CLK: Clock output from the frequency generator.
  • LED controller 0-3: LED current sinks. Connect LEDs in series with current limiting resistors from VCC to these pads.
  • 12-Bit A/D 0-3: Analog to digital converter inputs. They can operate single ended or differencial. The reference voltage is VCC.
  • Touch electrodes 0-6: Connect these pads to a larger conducting area to use it as touch sensor. The inputs 0-3 can also be used to drive LEDs. Refer to the datasheet for more information.
File:FRIDB-top.JPG
Top side with the M24LR64 and the TRF7960

Installation

Hardware installation

The best way to connect the FRIDB to your Freerunner is to solder four wires to...

Here is a PDF with an overview of the Installation.

Software installation

Issues

Known HW or SW Issues


Software

Kernel drivers

Upcoming.

Bugs

Userspace software

n/a yet. Volunteers welcome!

Availability

The handheld-linux.com team kindly offered to retail the FRIDB. You can find it here.


User Reports

Please write to the discussion page.