Biking

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The collection of information useful for biking with a Neo

Secure it to the bike

André Gaul documented a complete mounting kit [1]

It's just a prototype :) but with some foam around the handlebar and careful positioning to avoid bumps, a basic attachment like this might work [2] and makes it easy to "pinch" the screen when you need to finger tap something.

Crank up the charge

If you want to keep the GPS running and have the screen always on or staying on with a long timeout, you'll need a way to supplement power.

If you decide to try solar, it's recommended to get a flexible panel and attach it to your backback or something like that. It's unlikely anything below 10 watts will keep things running. (todo: add some data points). One nice advantage here is it might also charge even when you're not moving.

The alternative is to steal energy from the crank. You can do this with a hub dynamo or possibly with an induction generator like the one on the reelight [3] (warning... overuse of flash)

The regulator will have to be a do-it-yourself project regardless of the power source. See [4] for one approach. If you do want to try this with a switching regulator, there's a nice little pre-built module in the form factor of a linear regulator that should pop right in: [5]

Software for biking

  • TangoGPS
Personal tools

The collection of information useful for biking with a Neo

Secure it to the bike

André Gaul documented a complete mounting kit [1]

It's just a prototype :) but with some foam around the handlebar and careful positioning to avoid bumps, a basic attachment like this might work [2] and makes it easy to "pinch" the screen when you need to finger tap something.

Crank up the charge

If you want to keep the GPS running and have the screen always on or staying on with a long timeout, you'll need a way to supplement power.

If you decide to try solar, it's recommended to get a flexible panel and attach it to your backback or something like that. It's unlikely anything below 10 watts will keep things running. (todo: add some data points). One nice advantage here is it might also charge even when you're not moving.

The alternative is to steal energy from the crank. You can do this with a hub dynamo or possibly with an induction generator like the one on the reelight [3] (warning... overuse of flash)

The regulator will have to be a do-it-yourself project regardless of the power source. See [4] for one approach. If you do want to try this with a switching regulator, there's a nice little pre-built module in the form factor of a linear regulator that should pop right in: [5]

Software for biking

  • TangoGPS